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Elpis Israel
by Dr. John Thomas

Such were the practical and intelligible "words" with which the apostles comforted their brethren; but words which have become sealed and cabalistic, both to the unlearned and "the wise".

In conclusion, then, as far as power is concerned, God could have created all things upon a spiritual or incorruptible basis at once.

The globe could have been filled with men and women, equal to the angels in nature, power, and intellect, on the sixth day; but the world would have been without a history, and its population characterless.

This, however, would not have been according to the plan.

The animal must precede the spiritual as the acorn goes before the oak.

This will explain many difficulties which are created by systems; and which will for ever remain inexplicable upon the hypotheses they invent.

The Bible has to do with things, not imaginations; with bodies, not phantasmata; with "living souls" of every species; with corporeal beings of other worlds; and with incorruptible and undying men; but it is as mute as death, and silent as the grave, having nothing at all to say about such "souls" as men pretend to "cure"; except to repudiate them as a part of that "philosophy and vain deceit," "which some professing have erred concerning the faith".

THE FORMATION OF WOMAN "The woman was of the man".

Adam, having been formed in the image, after the likeness of the Elohim on the sixth day, remained for a short time alone in the midst of the earthborns of the field.

He had no companion who could reciprocate his intelligence; none who could minister to his wants, or rejoice with him in the delights of creation; and reflect the glory of his nature.

The Elohim are a society, rejoicing in the love and attachment of one another; and Adam, being like them though of inferior nature, required an object which should be calculated to evoke the latent resemblances of his similitude to theirs.

It was no better for man to be alone than for them.

Formed in their image, he had social feelings as well as intellectual and moral faculties, which required scope for their practical and harmonious exercise.

A purely intellectual and abstractly moral society, untempered by domesticism, is an imperfect state.

It may be very enlightened, very dignified and immaculate; but it would also be very formal, and frigid as the poles.

A being might know all things, and he might scrupulously observe the divine law from a sense of duty; but something more is requisite to make him amiable, and beloved by either God or his fellows.

This amiability the social feelings enable him to develop; which, however, if unfurnished with a proper object, or wholesome excitation, react upon him unfavourably, and make him disagreeable.

Well aware of this, Jehovah Elohim said, "It is not good that the man should be alone.

I will make him a help fit for him".

(Gen 2:8) But previous to the formation of this help, God caused "every living soul" (kol nephesh chayiah) to pass in review before Adam, that he might name them.

He saw that each one had its mate; "but for him there was not found a suitable companion".

It was necessary, therefore, to form one, the last and fairest of His handiworks.

The Lord had created man in His own "image and glory"; but He had yet to subdivide him into two; a negative and a positive division; an active and a passive half; male and female, yet one flesh.